Epsilon hacked and millions of emails compromised

The world’s largest “permissions-based” e-mail marketing company, Epsilon, reported late last week that someone hacked into its computer system and stole an unknown number of e-mail addresses and names.

The scope of this breach is huge, as Epsilon reports sending 40 billion e-mails per year on behalf of its 2,500 clients.Reuters says this is potentially “one of the biggest such breaches in U.S. history.” All customers who signed up to receive e-mails from these companies (see list below) can worry about their data being leaked:

  • TiVo
  • Walgreens
  • US Bank
  • Disney
  • JPMorgan Chase
  • Capital One
  • Citi
  • Home Shopping Network
  • McKinsey & Company
  • Ritz-Carlton Rewards
  • Marriott Rewards
  • New York & Company
  • Brookstone
  • The College Board

Read more about it on TechCrunch

BP reports data leak of 13,000 Gulf victims

BP (the oil giant company) admitted to losing a laptop containing the  private information of approximately 13,000 individuals that had filed claims following the gulf oil spill was reported lost by the company.

Data stored on the lost laptop include the following personnal details:

  • names
  • phone numbers
  • addresses
  • dates of birth
  • social security numbers

for individuals who filed claims related to last year’s disastrous Deepwater Horizon spill. BP has notified the individuals who may be affected and has offered free credit monitoring.

According to a statement from BP spokesman Tom Mueller, “There is no evidence that the laptop or data was targeted or that anyone’s personal data has in fact been compromised or accessed in any way. “We have sent written notice to individuals impacted by this event to inform them about the loss of their personal data and to offer them free credit monitoring services to help protect their personal information,” Mueller added.

A BP spokesperson made the following statement:

BP recently learned that a password-protected laptop computer was lost during business-related travel. This laptop contained personal information such as names, addresses, phone numbers, dates of birth, and Social Security Numbers of approximately 13,000 individuals who filed claims related to the Deepwater Horizon accident. The personal information was in a spreadsheet maintained by BP as part of a tracking process for claims arising from the Deepwater Horizon accident – part of the claims process before the Gulf Coast Claims Facility was established.

The lost laptop was immediately reported to law enforcement authorities and BP security, but has not been located despite a thorough search. There is no evidence that the laptop or data was targeted or that anyone’s personal data has in fact been compromised or accessed in any way. Our Security team continues to monitor the situation very closely and we are still in touch with authorities in an attempt to recover the laptop.

We have sent written notice to individuals impacted by this event to inform them about the loss of their personal data and to offer them free credit monitoring services to help protect their personal information.

BP takes the protection of personal information very seriously and deeply regrets the loss of the laptop.

 

Science magazin, special online collection: Dealing with Data

In its February 2011 issue, Science joins with colleagues fromScience SignalingScience Translational Medicine, and ScienceCareers to provide a broad look at the issues surrounding the increasingly huge influx of research data. This collection of articles highlights both the challenges posed by the data deluge and the opportunities that can be realized if we can better organize and access the data.

 

While there is some great success story such as “GenBank” the gene-sequence repository( GenBank created a common format for data storage and made it easy for researchers to access it). Article point out the lack of standard which lead to a situation where scientists are losing a lot of data.

The Science magazin is freely available from their website(click on the cover to download the pdf):

FEMA loss data after being able to restore

It’s not enough to recover data after an incident; also essential is restoring the software needed to read the data, as Federal Emergency Management Agency has learned.

Gov Info Security reported on the problems faced by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which experienced this towards the end of last year.

FEMA lost access to program data, including lessons learned and best practices, when a database server failed last May, according to an audit issued Tuesday by inspector general of theDepartment of Homeland Security, where the agency is based.

Gov Info Security continued: “Ironically, the lost data relate to FEMA’s Remedial Action Management Program that identifies operational and programmatic issues, lessons learned and best practices encountered during federal disaster response and recovery operations and exercises.”

According to the report, only 70 users directly accessed the data but they also serve as FEMA’s contact points to distribute any practices to a wider audience.

Last year, the National Security Agency in the US announced plans to build a data centre in Utah that will hold yottabytes of data – one of which is equivalent to 1,000,000,000,000,000GB.

Data Loss after MongoDB upgrade

According to many twitt multiple data loss would have occur after upgrade on MongoDb, currently no solution have been found to restore the data.

Follow this on twitter:

http://twitter.com/#search?q=mongodb%20data

Even if not confirm yet,  in the past, the 1.3.x dev release had a similar issue