Parallel programming

parallel_programming

How users and programmers see each others

fun

Happy 7th birthday MySQL bug #20786

http://bugs.mysql.com/bug.php?id=20786

[29 Jun 2006 22:31] Erik Kay reported the bug …..

 

[21 Jul 2011 1:27] John Swapceinski
I'm planning to throw a 5 year birthday party for this bug at the end of the month.
Who wants to come?  Anyone from MySQL/Sun/Oracle?  There will be cake.

[28 Jun 17:25] Ada Pascal
And now there has been cake:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oAiVsbXVP6k
Happy 7th birthday MySQL bug #20786!

Wikipedia Recent Changes Map

http://rcmap.hatnote.com/

When an unregistered user edits Wikipedia, he or she is identified by his or her IP address. These IP addresses are translated to users’ approximate geographic location. Edits by registered users do not have associated IP information, so the map actually represents only a small portion of the total edit activity on Wikipedia.

Built using d3DataMapsfreegeoip.net, and the Wikimedia RecentChanges IRC feed, broadcast through wikimon. Sourceavailable on github.

Built by Stephen LaPorte and Mahmoud Hashemi.

TV coverage of the internet in 1995

Most of you steal your software wrote Bill Gates

On February 3rd of 1976, almost 10 years before unveiling Windows 1.0, an irate young Bill Gates wrote the following open letter in response to piracy ofAltair BASIC, a piece of software Gates had produced with Paul Allen andMonte Davidoff, and which was essentially the first such release from Microsoft (then named Micro-Soft). The letter was published in a number of leading computer publications and caused quite a stir.

Interestingly, initial versions of the software itself pre-dated the widespread introduction of floppy disks, and as such it was released on paper tape — hence this photo of Altair BASIC 8K.

Transcript follows.

(Source: DigiBarn; Image: Bill Gates, via.)

 

billG

 

Transcript

February 3, 1976

An Open Letter to Hobbyists

To me, the most critical thing in the hobby market right now is the lack of good software courses, books and software itself. Without good software and an owner who understands programming, a hobby computer is wasted. Will quality software be written for the hobby market?

Almost a year ago, Paul Allen and myself, expecting the hobby market to expand, hired Monte Davidoff and developed Altair BASIC. Though the initial work took only two months, the three of us have spent most of the last year documenting, improving and adding features to BASIC. Now we have 4K, 8K, EXTENDED, ROM and DISK BASIC. The value of the computer time we have used exceeds $40,000.

The feedback we have gotten from the hundreds of people who say they are using BASIC has all been positive. Two surprising things are apparent, however, 1) Most of these “users” never bought BASIC (less than 10% of all Altair owners have bought BASIC), and 2) The amount of royalties we have received from sales to hobbyists makes the time spent on Altair BASIC worth less than $2 an hour.

Why is this? As the majority of hobbyists must be aware, most of you steal your software. Hardware must be paid for, but software is something to share. Who cares if the people who worked on it get paid?

Is this fair? One thing you don’t do by stealing software is get back at MITS for some problem you may have had. MITS doesn’t make money selling software. The royalty paid to us, the manual, the tape and the overhead make it a break-even operation. One thing you do do is prevent good software from being written. Who can afford to do professional work for nothing? What hobbyist can put 3-man years into programming, finding all bugs, documenting his product and distribute for free? The fact is, no one besides us has invested a lot of money in hobby software. We have written 6800 BASIC, and are writing 8080 APL and 6800 APL, but there is very little incentive to make this software available to hobbyists. Most directly, the thing you do is theft.

What about the guys who re-sell Altair BASIC, aren’t they making money on hobby software? Yes, but those who have been reported to us may lose in the end. They are the ones who give hobbyists a bad name, and should be kicked out of any club meeting they show up at.

I would appreciate letters from any one who wants to pay up, or has a suggestion or comment. Just write me at 1180 Alvarado SE, #114, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 87108. Nothing would please me more than being able to hire ten programmers and deluge the hobby market with good software.

(Signed)

Bill Gates
General Partner, Micro-Soft

openletter

Star Wars the traceroute to 216.81.59.173

 

X-Wing:~ Obiwan$ traceroute 216.81.59.173
traceroute to 216.81.59.173 (216.81.59.173), 64 hops max, 52 byte packets
1 192.168.0.1 (192.168.0.1) 3.855 ms 6.144 ms 3.560 ms
2 192.168.50.1 (192.168.50.1) 40.727 ms 43.076 ms 43.445 ms
3 85.94.224.117 (85.94.224.117) 45.400 ms 40.541 ms 43.536 ms
4 85.94.224.118 (85.94.224.118) 41.455 ms 42.656 ms 45.509 ms
5 gigabitethernet1-0-3.brucr3.brussels.opentransit.net (193.251.252.205) 49.345 ms 53.485 ms 51.376 ms
6 * * *
7 tengige0-0-0-2.amscr4.amsterdam.opentransit.net (193.251.132.190) 63.404 ms 58.893 ms 59.481 ms
8 ge-3-0-0-0.amscr1.amsterdam.opentransit.net (193.251.241.30) 53.590 ms 52.782 ms 51.337 ms
9 tiscali.gw.opentransit.net (193.251.247.98) 101.151 ms 98.864 ms 104.902 ms
10 xe-3-2-0.atl11.ip4.tinet.net (89.149.182.217) 203.965 ms
xe-0-0-0.atl11.ip4.tinet.net (89.149.183.141) 193.532 ms
xe-4-3-0.atl11.ip4.tinet.net (141.136.108.134) 197.429 ms
11 epik-networks-gw.ip4.tinet.net (77.67.69.158) 205.856 ms 203.580 ms 280.283 ms
12 po0-3.dsr2.atl.epikip.net (216.81.59.2) 192.436 ms 192.348 ms 199.716 ms
13 * * *
14 episode.iv (206.214.251.1) 476.639 ms * 352.947 ms
15 * * a.new.hope (206.214.251.6) 310.921 ms
16 * it.is.a.period.of.civil.war (206.214.251.9) 323.446 ms *
17 * rebel.spaceships (206.214.251.14) 340.721 ms 261.974 ms
18 striking.from.a.hidden.base (206.214.251.17) 352.108 ms 306.704 ms 307.160 ms
19 have.won.their.first.victory (206.214.251.22) 313.765 ms 306.583 ms 307.730 ms
20 against.the.evil.galactic.empire (206.214.251.25) 306.593 ms 306.860 ms 208.436 ms
21 during.the.battle (206.214.251.30) 303.375 ms 306.837 ms 307.038 ms
22 rebel.spies.managed (206.214.251.33) 200.175 ms * 310.860 ms
23 to.steal.secret.plans (206.214.251.38) 307.023 ms 197.310 ms 196.685 ms
24 to.the.empires.ultimate.weapon (206.214.251.41) 322.261 ms 200.879 ms 195.895 ms
25 the.death.star (206.214.251.46) 194.096 ms 198.092 ms 199.969 ms
26 an.armored.space.station (206.214.251.49) 202.006 ms 306.768 ms 195.193 ms
27 with.enough.power.to (206.214.251.54) 199.758 ms 201.852 ms 206.063 ms
28 destroy.an.entire.planet (206.214.251.57) 252.042 ms 198.598 ms 197.964 ms
29 pursued.by.the.empires (206.214.251.62) 197.900 ms 193.098 ms 192.086 ms
30 sinister.agents (206.214.251.65) 203.701 ms 201.241 ms 198.251 ms
31 princess.leia.races.home (206.214.251.70) 211.240 ms 202.247 ms 202.471 ms
32 aboard.her.starship (206.214.251.73) 191.778 ms 198.030 ms 189.907 ms
33 custodian.of.the.stolen.plans (206.214.251.78) 186.267 ms 189.815 ms 193.976 ms
34 that.can.save.her (206.214.251.81) 195.806 ms 188.990 ms 188.156 ms
35 people.and.restore (206.214.251.86) 201.697 ms 197.366 ms 195.788 ms
36 freedom.to.the.galaxy (206.214.251.89) 186.050 ms 196.166 ms 189.820 ms
37 0——————-0 (206.214.251.94) 188.027 ms 190.750 ms 193.926 ms
38 0——————0 (206.214.251.97) 194.133 ms 190.426 ms 192.953 ms
39 0—————–0 (206.214.251.102) 190.215 ms 191.301 ms 191.896 ms
40 0—————-0 (206.214.251.105) 190.136 ms 188.613 ms 185.960 ms
41 0—————0 (206.214.251.110) 192.230 ms 187.161 ms 191.884 ms
42 0————–0 (206.214.251.113) 186.272 ms 195.463 ms 187.974 ms
43 0————-0 (206.214.251.118) 196.075 ms 214.228 ms 201.252 ms
44 0————0 (206.214.251.121) 194.730 ms 206.663 ms 206.168 ms
45 0———–0 (206.214.251.126) 197.909 ms 196.038 ms 202.004 ms
46 0———-0 (206.214.251.129) 205.528 ms 200.903 ms 201.793 ms
47 0———0 (206.214.251.134) 196.157 ms 198.710 ms 193.619 ms
48 0——–0 (206.214.251.137) 192.350 ms 191.562 ms 192.446 ms
49 0——-0 (206.214.251.142) 199.800 ms 189.751 ms 188.126 ms
50 0——0 (206.214.251.145) 192.127 ms 186.379 ms 192.177 ms
51 0—–0 (206.214.251.150) 197.603 ms 193.695 ms 193.033 ms
52 0—-0 (206.214.251.153) 190.457 ms 185.677 ms 191.963 ms
53 0—0 (206.214.251.158) 188.048 ms 306.744 ms 194.330 ms
54 0–0 (206.214.251.161) 189.846 ms 191.037 ms 188.237 ms
55 0-0 (206.214.251.166) 194.193 ms 194.301 ms 189.451 ms
56 00 (206.214.251.169) 193.939 ms 188.246 ms 188.171 ms
57 i (206.214.251.174) 195.888 ms 192.814 ms 191.844 ms
58 by.ryan.werber (206.214.251.177) 200.077 ms 188.974 ms 192.547 ms
59 when.ccies.get.bored (206.214.251.182) 197.359 ms 198.654 ms 189.917 ms
60 read.more.at.beaglenetworks.net (206.214.251.185) 193.864 ms 189.386 ms 198.111 ms
61 fin (206.214.251.190) 205.760 ms * *
X-Wing:~ Obiwan$

The day PNG image file format became more popular than GIF

According to w3techs.com today PNG image file format became more popular than GIF

Source: http://w3techs.com/blog/entry/the_png_image_file_format_is_now_more_popular_than_gif

Summary:

The PNG image file format has been created in 1995 as a response to some patent issues around the then-prevailing GIF format. PNG has gained popularity ever since, and it is now used on more websites than GIF.

PNG is now used on 62.4% of all websites, just ahead of GIF with 62.3%. GIF was leading by more than 15% one year ago.

PNG is now the most popular lossless image compression format on the web. Only the lossy JPEG, which is the most appropriate format for photographs, is used on more sites.

Disney to Acquire Lucasfilm Ltd

Job interview

From geekandpoke